Crested Butte, The ASSASSIN-WICH and I Made It Out ALIVE!

Crested Butte, The ASSASSIN-WICH and I Made It Out ALIVE!.

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Hump Day Hook – Gotta Love a Cowboy

Good morning and thanks for dropping in today.  I’m interviewing Celia, from Comanche Haven, book 1 of the Loflin Legacy series.  Let’s begin.

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Do you enjoy a western romance?  Do you imagine yourself immersed in the 1850s and struggling to be a lone woman?  How about a lone woman with Comanche blood coursing through her veins?  How about a Comanche war chief’s only daughter who has been away for more than a decade.  Her world has been very different from the one she returns to in Texas during one of the most turbulent times in the state’s history.  Her father is always at odds with the white settlers, and the young warriors want blood.  She, on the other hand, is an educated woman with a talent for healing.  Her last position was Fort Sumter, South Carolina.  Now her father is gravely ill, and she’s back to take care of him.  Please let me welcome you to Celia, or Little One, her Comanche name among The People.  She’s recently agreed to this interview by telegram.  Now that she’s back, she’d like to share her thoughts and opinions about the town of Tyler, Texas and those she remembers from the past.

Thank you for agreeing to speak to me today, Celia.  I appreciate you taking the time.

I am honored to speak to you, Catherine, regarding my arrival and The People.  So much has changed.  I am looking forward to seeing my father again.

How long has it been since you saw your father, Lone Eagle, Celia?

More than ten years.

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That’s a long time, how much has changed since you were here.  I’m sorry, but I must ask, why did you leave?  The readers, I’m sure, are interested in knowing.

Yes, it has been a long time since I was home.  My father wanted to keep me safe from all the conflict between the Comanche and the white man.  The reason I left is complicated.   Let us just say; my life was threatened, and my father sent me back to my mother’s people in South Carolina.  I was sent to boarding school and a finishing school.  Then I acquired a position as a physician’s assistant at Fort Sumter.

My, but I have to say, that’s amazing.  Not only because you’re a woman, but more, because you’re half Comanche.  Did you find it difficult to fit into southern society during your years there?

I’m sorry, I don’t mean to laugh.  It’s just that to speak of it seems so trite.  You’d have to be there to understand completely.  My mother’s mother saw me as an embarrassment to the family and quickly disposed of me in a boarding school.  I then went on to a finishing school, and when I turned eighteen, I found a job at Fort  Sumter as a physician’s assistant.  The Army, apparently, was laxer in employing a half-breed.

I see.  Fascinating, indeed.  You got a telegram recently from your cousin, Broken Horse, a representative for The People in treaty talks.  He told you your father was gravely ill.  Is that why you returned?

Yes, I sold everything I owned and packed to come back to Tyler.  I’ll be traveling to his camp shortly, and I hope to treat his illness.  My father is the only parent I have left.

I appreciate your concern for you father.  Will the tribe welcome you?  Are there others you remember from your life before leaving Texas?you father.  Will the tribe welcome you?  Are there others you remember from your life before leaving Texas?

The People are a proud people with deep roots.  I will welcome them as they welcome me.  I will be home.  There are others who I remember quite well.  I would be pleased to see the cowboy, Seth Loflin again.  He was a friend of The People and my father loved him.  I…I cared for him very much.  You’ll need to allow me to go now.  I have to leave.  Broken Horse has arrived.

Indeed, I appreciate you agreeing to speak to me. I  wish you…  What… Miss Celia, what’s wrong?  You look as though you’ve seen a ghost, Celia.  Here, sit down.  You’re as white as a sheet.  Can I get you some water?

I…no…I thought I saw someone.  I was mistaken.  Thank you, no, I have to go now.  My apologies.  Good-bye.

Of course, I understand.  Good luck and God’s speed.

***

As she walked away, I’d like to point out that Celia seemed quite disturbed by the appearance of a certain cowboy.  He’s a tall, dark haired man.  My, but he’s handsome.  I’m going to go over and see if I can speak to him.  “Sir, excuse me.  Sir, uh, I’d like to ask you a question.  Quite disturbed by the appearance of a certain cowboy.  He’s a tall, dark haired man.  My, but he’s handsome.  I’m going to go over and see if I can speak to him.  “Sir, excuse me.  Sir, uh, I’d like to ask you a question.  Quit disturbed by the appearance of a certain cowboy.  He’s a tall, dark haired man.  My, but he’s handsome.  I’m going to go over and see if I can speak to him.  “Sir, excuse me.  Sir, uh, I’d like to ask you a question.

Yes, ma’am.

What is your name?”

Seth Loflin, ma’am.

Hump Day Hook blog hop

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Well, there you have it.  Thanks for dropping by today.  Enjoy book one as well as Casey’s Gunslinger and the cliff-hanger prequel, Salvation’s Secrets, which is free.  You can view these westerns and my paranormal tales at http://www.amazon.com/Catherine-Wolffe/e/B006ICE8SO

Catherine Wolffe

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